ME BASICALLY

howdoiputthisgently:

image

This is a legitimate issue

Right

Here are somethings I want to do:

1. Apply to grad school

2. Write about my work. 

3. Write about how health journalism inaccuracies are harmful, or at least how they bother me

4. Write about life

5. Find new people to follow on Tumblr

6. Not procrastinate

Ready. Set

lipstickstainedlove:

FAVORITE

We are all Ilana

(Source: mvgl)

Peel my fear off. Take a brief glimpse on the inside. Get scared. Lie. Run. Off you go.

(Source: donutstiel)

billbezy:

Market in Arusha, Tanzania

:)

billbezy:

Market in Arusha, Tanzania

:)

My new desktop at work

My new desktop at work

(Source: awwww-cute)

Tumblr: Scrollsuck

I came back on because I wanted to start writing actual blog posts and now its taken me an hour just to write this

(Source: highdeft)

npr:

youknowyoureafloridianwhen:

Good morning!

Happy Friday, everyone! 
– Alexander

npr:

youknowyoureafloridianwhen:

Good morning!

Happy Friday, everyone! 

– Alexander

I find many adults are put off when young children pose scientific questions. Why is the Moon round? the children ask. Why is grass green? What is a dream? How deep can you dig a hole? When is the world’s birthday? Why do we have toes? Too many teachers and parents answer with irritation or ridicule, or quickly move on to something else: ‘What did you expect the Moon to be, square?’ Children soon recognize that somehow this kind of question annoys the grown-ups. A few more experiences like it, and another child has been lost to science. Why adults should pretend to omniscience before 6-year-olds, I can’t for the life of me understand. What’s wrong with admitting that we don’t know something? Is our self-esteem so fragile?